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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 157 (some duplicates have been removed)
an answer or maybe not oh easy answer. this is not just something that is science fiction. we have to deal with it. anything that anybody has mentioned. >> we keep hearing everybody talk about it. we're going to come back and learn from this and build something stronger arrested better. you hear the politicians say that now after this situation that we've had. i have not heard one specific thing like this is what we're going to do. this is how much it's going to cost. homeland security secretary quoteds a saying, this could be the most expensive recovery in history. hurricane katrina cost $106 billion. that's how much it cost to recover from that hurricane. this is going to surpass that. people are going to be thinking what can we do better so we don't have these horrible situations happen, and spending all this money that america will have to spend to recover from it it. >> eliot: the ex-spans and swath from new jersey, pennsylvania upwards, the devastation is huge. the economic toll, the cost of human life enormous, and awful to see. brandi hitt, thank you for joining us tonight. >> eli
often our conversations about these issues are exclusively engineering and physical science kinds of questions. those matter, no doubt. they're fundamental, but there's a social dimension to this as well, which neighborhoods are affected, which individual people are affected, and it's predictable. >> fascinating, zone "a" ev evacua evacuated, low-lying residents there were twice as likely to be residents of. >>> i want to bring in ed markey, co-sponsor of the only climate bill to ever pass the chamber of congress. congressman, what is your reaction to the stunning absence of this issue that you worked so hard on and labored over and ground out a large bill with tons of technical details to carve votes on and it's now disappeared from the political conversation? >> well, i think that -- i think that mother nature decided that she was going to inject it into this election. if it wasn't going to be raised in any of the debates, then she was going to find a way of having this be discussed. and so this election for next tuesday is now framed. it's mother nature versus the unrestrained
. but you're quite right that many scientists have been very cautious and science has a cautious culture. you could almost say a conservative culture. their peer review process discourages them from even thinking about going out on a limb. and so they -- they are inherently cautious and conservative. but the evidence is now so overwhelming. you know, in the last ten years you showed some of the statistics but there there's an analysis of the extreme hot temperatures on the surface of the earth. they're now 100 times more common than they were just 30 years ago. and it is these extremely hot temperatures that are responsible for the increased evaporation, the increased water vapor in the air the increased drought. and remember this is hardly the only climate related disaster that we've had this year. 65% of the united states has been affected by a very widespread and extreme drought this year. food prices have been affected. much of the west, including the epic fire in colorado springs was on fire this summer
happened here, where so many experts in the field of environmental science have suggested that what is happening with these severe weather systems is becoming more frequent, as a result of climate change? >> well, martin, governor romney hasn't said a whole lot about a lot of things recently. you know, folks asked him 14 times yesterday, whether he was going to -- whether he wanted to get rid of fema. the last thing he heard or the last thing i remember hearing from governor romney on climate change was, he was questioning the science of climate change. and this is the same person who, when he was governor the first two years, was one of the leaders of reggie, the state consortium of governors, who wanted to do something about greenhouse gas emissions. two years later, he pulls out of it, as he was ramping up his run for president, the first run for president in 2008. so i think, you just -- he's been on every side of this issue, so the latest incarnation is that governor romney has questioned the science behind climate change. >> but also, john, i remember mr. romney's speech at th
-- the national academy of sciences, the journal, proceedings of the national academy of sciences took a survey of scientists who work on this a couple of years ago, and there was agreement among 97% of scientists that fossil fuel emissions from human activity lead to global warming. are warming the atmosphere. that's an incredibly high consensus. so it's 97% in agreement. 3% in disagreement. at this consensus. at this point the scientific consensus is very, very strong that burning coal and oil and fossil fuels is warming the planet and leading to these extreme weather situations. >> so, this question really, then, is directed to the 3% of scientists as we look at the latest cover of "business week" it speaks for itself, coral, we had new york city mayor michael bloomberg endorsing the president in a piece largely focused on climate change. is this a wake-up call and could it end the debate? >> the problem is you can't ever say any one specific weather event is caused by climate change but you can look at the growing stack of reports saying we know we're going to see more of this. the national
could talk about what is going on -- what is the current state of science education in the united states? may be some of your view of what we could be doing better -- may be some of your view of what we could be doing better. >> the u.s. is a prominent science and engineering producer in the world. you will get all kinds of dissonance in the numbers i feel quantitatively because of their large engineering graduation rates in some very large countries come up to believe china, but there's a lot of dispute about what those numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, the science and engineering fields in the u.s. at the university level are the highest, though others are catching up, as others have said, because u.s. was the only man left standing or only person left standing at the end of world war ii, and it had the free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 concerned, things are quite different. you have a huge disparity in the quality, even within 50 miles or so. i think of where we're sitting today. you would probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, and t
that you can. so, we use those kinds of principles that are basically at the heart of a lot of science to be able to do this somewhat miraculous feet producing an accurate representation by just talking with a small fraction. host: are they accurate? guest: well, they are. polling has a very good track record of accurately predicting the elections even though that is not our main purpose. is one way we can know that polls are accurate. in fact, of all the surveys that are done it is one of the only ones that has a very clear outside way to validate all the polsters including the pew will do a final poll and put the estimates out the next week or so before the election and on election day we will find out how accurate we were. four years ago we were within one point of picking the exact mark. eight years ago we were dead on the margin. and we are not the only ones that have a good track record. most polling does a very good job of predicting how the election will turn out. host: how do you a do a poll from the beginning to the end? guest: it is a fairly straightforward process. we do se
science to get in the way of politics but the obama administration hasn't been out front on the issue either. we will talk mother nature's revenge when chris hayes joins us just ahead. i don't spend money on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. [ male announcer ] and it's not just these owners giving the volt high praise. volt received the j.d. power and associates appeal award two years in a row. ♪ i honestly loved smoking, and i honestly didn't think i would ever quit. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. it put me at ease that you could smoke on the first week. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these stop t
change and casting doubt on the science of climate change cost him dearly today. new york's independent mayor mike bloomberg endorsed president obama referring both to hurricane irene last august and sandy this week. bloomberg wrote and i quote "in just 14 months, two hurricanes have forced us to evacuate nakeds, something our city had -- never done before. i want our president to place scientific evidence and risk management above electoral politics." for more, we have on the phone -- what's going on to get to millions of commuters to work tomorrow, i'm joined by phone by metropolitan transportation spokesman aaron donovan. thanks for joining us. >> thanks, governor, you bet. >> eliot: we know you've begun to get some of the subways above 34th and 42nd street moving again. what will be open tomorrow and then if you could, give us an update on the tunnels which seem to be the major impediment to expanding traffic. >> well, at this point in time, our subway system is essentially cut in half. we have some service
-- >> jennifer: that's the language of science right? >> it isn't really. much of science isn't like that. like anything that i just mentioned about biology economics and so on. but climate scientists are using that incorrectly. there is real systemic causation here. and systemic causation happens when certain things are present. for example you might have multiple causes. you might have a network of causes. you might have feedback groups. all of those really occur in nature. and what happens here is very clear. in hurricane sandy you have a special kind of hurricane that is normal. actually when you have global warming. it is normal because its characterization is it's huge. it has a huge amount of moisture. it has a huge amount of energy that goes into the winds. how does this happen? every climate scientist knows perfectly well that when you have global warming you get more evaporation over the oceans lots more moisture in the air. when that happens you get heat in the oceans. heat transfers in storms into wind
. >> reporter: uc berkeley political science professor lin says voters even now are not paying a great deal of attention to the campaign on tv. sandy could change that. >> this is the kind of news event that will turn voters on. they'll be watching the news, they'll see the candidates but will see obama acting as president. >> reporter: the vice president tried to reenforce that imagine. >> i've never seen a guy so focused. >> reporter: governor romney turned a campaign rally in ohio into a storm relief drive. >> romney is in a tougher situation. he has to appear like he's not campaigning and yet he still needs to be in the news. >> would you eliminate fema if you before president? >> reporter: romney was peppered with questions of his plan to end fema. >> if mistakes are made, people will note them and it could hurt them. >> reporter: what would sandy's impact be on the election pundents on the days after the election. it could take historians months, days or years to truly sort out. >>> more than 100 tenants could be evicted from their floating homes. we'll tell you what the redwood city
. with advances in science and technology, there's -- health of the mother has been -- has become a tool for abortions for any time under any reason. >> so there's a pretty strong argument that there's no one's ever died in childbirth, i know what the science is exactly. what to you make of it with these claims now this shouldn't be an exception for life or health of the mother which we know most people honor those exceptions. >> they're simply not true. i thing he's been going to the todd akin school of biology. 1 in 40 pregnancies, women have pre-eclampsia. there are a number of reasons. but the point is this is not what this district is. this is a moderate district of hardworking people, and they believe that women, you know, should be trusted to make decisions about their own bodies. and congressman walsh simply doesn't. >> tammy duckworth, thank you so much for coming on "hardball." good luck next week. >>> when we return, let me finish with a word of warning about mitt romney's transformation in the last couple days, you know, to moderate. >>> let me finish tonight with this. it's
the whole man here, you're the senior science journalist for the "huffington post." okay, we we could put walls up, but shouldn't we go to the source of the problem fossil fuels. >> you have to mitigate the effects because in some respects it is a little too late to reverse this problem. but you also want to work as hard as you can to stop it from getting any worse. we can talk about this kind of two degree celsius problem, and we can get to the technical stuff. but the truth is it's already gotten so bad and even if we stopped putting emissions in the atmosphere it will still get worse for many, many years. >> cenk: let's talk about that for a minute. we have thisthere is magical reverse when we need it. it seems that that would be the time. >> they're saying, the scientists will do all that. >> cenk: seriously is there a way to reverse it. >> to reverse climate change? >> cenk: it just times. >> it a function of making sure it doesn't get worse. we are we at that level. >> cenk: that was a hard-hitting ad against mitt romney against climate change. should democrats--that was an outside
% in favor. >> we're talking about 11 fewer days to go ahead and teach the math, the science and the reading. it's important for our students. >> my biggest concern is giving more money to the senators and having them just spend it away. >> prop 30 would raise the state's sale tax and income tax on californians making $250,000 or more. >>> sports of a measure that would require genetically modified foods to be labeled will hold several rallies today in the bay area. supporters said that consumers should be able to choose whether to eat the foods. and opponents say their safe to eat so additional labeling should not be required. they say, if so, the cost will be passed on to the consumer. >>> groundbreaking ceremonies was held for a new food coto the area. and there are plans for other stores to be built in the same shopping center. >>> the california health department is warning people not to eat bulk house farms carrot chips because they could be contaminated to salmonella. they're voluntarily recalling 16-ounce bags of carrot chips with the best if used by dates of november 12th and 13th.
, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. connell: governor cuomo helping to get this gas shortage fixed pretty soon. hopefully some relief pretty quickly. dagen: we go to new jersey where we find elizabeth macdonald on the scene. >> good to be with you guys. we are about 40 miles. we are in transit. 40 miles or the new york city. we are seeing the lines continue to grow. it is a 2-mile long. there were state troopers trying to keep tteir peace out here. fuel tankers are entering new york harbor. expect a fuel shortage to ease quickly. 80% of the gas stations in new jersey are off-line. they do not have power. fox business has learned from aaa that the reason why 80% of the gas stations are off-line is due to power issues, electrical power is needed to run the gas pump. it is also needed to run the gas pipelines that delivers the fuel into the area. according to authorities, this dual problem will be starting to ease come sunday and into next week. they are saying if you do not need to be on the roads, do not be on the road. we are t
from his first daof work this last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. frotd ameritrade. >> well, today's big storm on the east coast taking some attention away from the election and it's only eight days away. and both candidates are more focused on hurricane sandy. obviously, all of us across the country are concerned about the potential impact of hurricane sandy. this is a serious and big storm. charles: and also appears to be slowing town mitt romney's momentum. the latest gallup has romney up 4 points, 50-46 down one point from the previous poll and the latest rasmussen poll has romney romney by 3. we'll get the new number from scott rasmussen shortly and the washington poll, romney with a 1 point lead for the third consecutive day and a lot of people are talking about the controversial ad featuring, actress lena dunham. >> and of anybody, we want to do it with a great guy, it should be with a guy with beautiful, who understands women. >> and andrea, what congresswoman marsha blackburn. a young actress voting for the essential october is offensive to me f
is sort of the science of the campaign. the obama campaign has its ground game down to precise numbers, who they have to turn out where, they're spending so much time and money figuring this out. that's science. the romney campaign is passion, energy, they're coming on, their campaign seems a little more excited. part of that's the nature of being a challenger versus an incumbent running a re-election. depending on which city you're in, boston or chicago, you come out with two different -- both make really compelling cases for themselves. the polls are tight enough that either one could be totally not spinning and believing it, but who knows? >> who knows? >> tom brokaw, just final thoughts in the final days of the campaign, how much should the events matter? then you've got the science of the campaign muddled by the storm. >> well, if nothing happens that is unexpected between now and then, the scenario is going to be does the romney wave override the obama ground game and getting out the vote? the romney people have been counting on what happened with reagan, as you know, in 1980. di
cyclone. it was actually more like a winter storm when you look at the science behind it. and so that is covered. >> we're watching the president and chris christie make their way to the microphone. we'll cut away to that in a moment. >> okay. >> how soon will you be able to write these checks, tom? >> we're writing checks and putting people in hotels and things right now. we're helping people get their lives back together immediately. >> can you characterize how big this storm is in terms of the bottom line on allstate, versus other storms? >> i can't speak for just allstate but the industry estimates are of course it's speculative at this point but looks like it could be the fifth biggest hurricane in the history of the united states so it's a large, severe hurricane but in terms of allstate we're well covered. >> and you are putting people up in hotels and trying to answer their claims right away is what you just said. >> we're doing everything we can. we need help contacting loved ones if they need help with water, getting clothes, getting into hotels, we have people go door
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to our continuing coverage of the aftermath of hurricane sandy. we keep getting new pictures that show this storm's strength. different prospectives from people in their own homes. here's some incredible video of the winds uprooting a tree on or in a backyard of the north shore of long island. it takes a few seconds. but as you can see right there, you can already see the ground starting to move. it's obviously a very old tree. just take a look and listen. >> uh-oh. uh-oh. >> so sad to see. the root system in that tree very far spread out. sandy still hitting parts of west virginia hard tonight. with snow, though, not rain. heavy, wet snow, weighing down trees, knocking down power lines. utility companies say more than 340,000 customers are without power. some areas of the state under a blizzard warning tonight. one death is being reported so far there. martin savidge joins us from west virginia. martin, the conditions you've been seeing for the last --
science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> what i can't promise you is that the federal government will be working as closely as possible with the state and local officials and we will not quit until this is done. >> we're going to box these things up in just a minute and put them on some trucks, and then we're going to send them into i think it's new jersey is a site that we've identified that can take these goods and distribute them to people who need them. >> oh, it's hard out there for a presidential candidate who is utterly irrelevant to the massive relief effort president obama is running in the aftermath of this week's historic storm. because the desperate and shameless romney campaign believes it cannot win the election without winning ohio, team romney pushed their poor candidate out onto a stage in ohio yesterday because the storm was still in progress in some states and the death count was climbing in new york and elsewhere. traditional political decency dictated that mitt romney not be caught campaigning yesterday. and so team romney hastily rewrote a campaig
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> it's hard out there for a man named mitt this week. we have some very, very silly video of mitt romney. next. in "the rewrite." ♪ [ crowd cheering ] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ that's the sound of car insurance companies these days. here a cheap, there a cheap, everywhere a cheap... you get it. so, what if instead of just a cheap choice, you could make a smart choice? like, esurance for example. they were born online and built to save people money from the beginning. it's what they've always done. not just something they cheap about. that's insurance for the modern world. esurance. now backed by allstate. click or call. >>> what i can promise you is the federal government will be working as closely as possible with the state and local officials and we will not quit until this is done. >> we're going to box these things up in just a minute and put them on some trucks, and then we're going to send them into i think it's new jersey is a site that we've identified that can take these goods and distribute the
, science, research. and guess what? plenty of folks running for congress at the time said it would hurt the economy. that it would kill jobs. and if that argument sounds familiar, one of those candidates back then happens to be running for president right now. and it turns out, their math was just as bad back then as it is today because, by the end of bill clin totoclinton's turn am created 23 million jobs. the biggest surplus in our history. wisconsin we know the ideas that work. we also know the ideas that don't work. because in the eight years after bill clinton left office his policies were reversed. the wealthiest americans got tax cuts they didn't need, and that we couldn't afford. companies enjoyed tax breaks for shipping jobs overseas, insurance companies, oil companies, wall street given free license do what they pleased. folks, at the top got to play by a different set of rules than the rest of us. and result of this top-down economics was falling incomes, record deficits, smallest job growth in a half century and economic crisis that we've been cleaning up for the last four y
as health of the mother, same thing with the science of technology, health of the mother has become a tool for abortions for any time under any reason. >> so there's a pretty strong argument that there's no one that has ever died in child birth. i don't know what the science is. what do you make of the claims and most people are. >> that's not true. he's been going to the todd akin school of biology, to be honest. in fact, one in 40 pregnancies are he can topic pregnancy where the fertilize tube and results in the loss of the fetus if you don't -- to save the life of the mother. women who have cancer and need chemotherapy, there's a number of reasons. but the point is, this is not where this district is. it's a moderate district of hardworking people and they believe that women, you know, should be trusted to make decisions about their own bodieses and congressman walsh simply doesn't. >> tammy duckworth, thank you. >>> when we return, mitt romney's amazing transformation, you know, to moderate. you're watching "hardball," a place for politics. ♪ this will literally probably never happen
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. [ husband ] transfer! [ male announcer ] free data transfer at home. you just deleted all the photos! you did! no you did! [ male announcer ] or free data transfer when you buy a windows 8 computer at staples. another way staples makes it easier to upgrade. when you buy a windows 8 computer at staples. this is hayden. he's five years that's elizabeth. and that's skyler... and his mom, nancy. they're just a few of the californians who took it on themselves to send you a message about what they need to restore years of cuts to their schools. prop thirty-eight. thirty-eight raises billions in new revenue - bypasses sacramento and sends every k through 12 dollar straight to our local schools... every school. for them. for all of us. vote yes on thirty-eight. >>> this year's presidential debate cycle was the first since 1988 in which candidates or moderators failed to directly address the issue of climate change. i guess they just didn't get around to it. now just days before the election, hurricane
science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. which isn't rocket science. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> you've seen the lines, the angry customers. you know the story -- there just isn't enough gasoline for everybody that needs it in the impact zone of this storm. before we go to our reporters from the latest -- for the latest from the front lines, let's take a step back and walk through the whole process from ground to pump. crude oil that is pumped from the ground is then transported by pipeline, tanker or barge to a refinery. and that's where the oil undergoes several processes, changing it into many products. but mainly for this purpose, gasoline. from there it is shipped, usually again through a pipeline, to a terminal. at th
down off the coast of baja, california yesterday afternoon. it brought back a ton of science experiment, medical samples and old space station gear. >>> do you think you have a bad rush hour? take a look. yesterday in madrid more than 2,000 sheep meandered through the city following a route used 800 years ago. it defended ancient grazing rights. >> children aren't always the most diplomatic. kate middleton promoted her book. one girl told the sister of duchess of cambridge what she thought about princesses. >> bet when you were 10 you loved it. >> i hate it. >> well then. excuse me. kate middleton's book called "celebrate" offers tips on entertaining through the year. i'm surprised she didn't have words for pipa. >>> coming up we'll have full coverage of hurricane sandy as it gets ready to make landfall along the mid-atlantic coast. i'm terrell brown reporting from new york this morning. this is the "cbs morning news". his morning. this is the "cbs morning news". [ female announcer ] today, jason is here to volunteer to help those in need. when a twinge of back pain surprises him. morni
other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> jennifer: so for several months now, christine pelosi and i have been trying to get duf sundheim to throw his support behind the president. tonight is our final penitentiary. welcome back to you both. duf are you ready to say uncle? >> you know what, i didn't find the fact that you called the fact that your father your favorite republican, but when you put christie ahead of me it hurt my feelings. >> jennifer: all right. epic fail on my part. >> here you can have the halloween candy. okay. chris christie had a beautiful moment today. not only did barack obama look very presidential but chris christie took a tentative step towards 2016. >> jennifer: yeah, let's just say that duf could have a beautiful moment right here. >> i think that was back in april 15th that you were right. >> jennifer: let me do something here, duf. vice president biden had a very interesting line about mitt romney today. take a listen in florida. >> his plans are sketchy, they are etch-a-sketchy. that's wh
most climate science is junk science, they even would never tie an event ike this to climate change. here's the thing that i pointed out to you, andrew, the last category 3 hurricane was wilma, that was seven years ago. this is the longest period in a century in terms of how long we've been between category 3. back in 1954, between august '54 and august of 1955, the east coast saw three different storms make landfall each of which caused twice as much damage as sandy. now you weren't born in 1954. it caused twice as much. here's the chart of the average global temperature and this quietly was reported by the uk climate office. that shows the average variability from 14 degrees celsius which is the average. there's the no discernible rise in 16 years. >> cuomo's point he was trying to stay out of the controversial subject. he said the political ban derte doesn't want to get to. his question is should new york be prepared for flooding. maybe this is a situation talked about yesterday we're building in areas we shouldn't be building in. >> the storm that caused $180 billion in damage.
things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> they might annoy rush a little bit more. needs america's help tonight. that is in the rewrite. [ fishing rod casting line, marching band playing ] [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> chris trchristie is not the only republican ajust praising obama, is it wrong for one man to love another man? but that manlove out there is isolated in the state of new jersey. >> rush limbaugh might not like it but it received the most applause on the campaign trail today. >> for me to get the things done that i've just described i'm going to need to reach across the aisle and there are good democrats like that. i'm going to meet regularly with democrat leaders. >> when mayor bloomberg make our announcement today.
financial crisis. he has worked to develop new systems and data visualization tools with social science analysis. his writing has appeared in "the wall street journal." it is my pleasure to welcome to the state chair dr. kim. [applause] >> take you for your kind introduction. but the korean economic institute is honored to be a co- sponsor of this panel of the united states current and past assistant secretaries of state for east asian affairs. i can think of no better partners than the amend school of foreign services and the president and georgetown university to share this platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i think that that 21st century will be seen as the asia-pacific century. much of the economic dynamism and grit will emerge from this region. many of the toughest gruel challenges as well. the rise of china, the prospects of asian economic integration, and the scurvy problems on the korean peninsula. u.s. leadership and continuous engagement in this region will be critical in these and many more issues ahead. as the president of the e
science guy. i have to tell you, michael bloomberg is an opportunist. you violated the new york city charter by running for a third term as mayor. we are in a very dire state here and i wish republicans run the country would offer us new york republicans help and an opportunity to really balance out the political system here. host: thank you for the call this morning. if a time for a few more calls. all weekend long we will be featuring the history and literary life of vermont capital city with a population of just about 8000 people. the smallest united states state capitol. here is the mayor talking about the city. [video clip] >> it is the smallest state capital and america. in terms of vermont, we have the largest historic district in the state. it is a very historic community, founded in 1791. it is run to about 20,000 during the day. largely because of the jobs that are here, the center of commerce and the area. we are fortunate here that we are somewhat insulated from a lot of the trends that occurred nationally. our economy is pretty stable because we rely on the state as a pr
him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> all right. we continue to watch hurricane sandy. it's roughly about 200 miles off the coast of north carolina, roughly 500 miles from new york city. but places from north carolina all the way up to maine are bracing. in fact, we have a few updates. d.c., federal offices will be closed to the public tomorrow. we already know that washington, d.c., public schools are closed. more on hurricane sandy straight ahead. we know that mass transit from buses in new york will be closed or will shut down starting at 9:00 this evening and 7:00 for the subway system. that's impacting a bunch of people. much more ahead on "newsroom" with don lemon. this is a monster storm that could take many directions stat. states and cities are taking different directions and you can't be complacent. >> it is almost too late. you have been here since 2:00 on the snare. >> yeah, and you have a long haul for the evening. things will be changing on the dime, we know that.
into the pacific ocean after a two week trip up to the space station. brought back a ton of science experiments and equipment. the dragon is the only delivery ship capable now of returning cargo now that the shuttle program has ended. >> in health news, sweating could make you smarter. researchers put 6 adults who didn't exercise on a regular workout program. four months later, the participants were healthier but performed better on cognitive tests. >>> is facebook better than sex? well, it might be. a new study of college aged adults tracked their most irresistible desires and facebook along with checking e-mails and surfing the web were more irresistible. one reason might be it's easier and more convenient to check social media sites than it is to have sex in the middle of the day. >> your facebook is open right now. your twitter account is open. your cbs e-mail is open. your regular e-mail is open. >> and that's all i'm going to say about that. >> we're going to leave it right there. >> the san francisco giant's win has one down side for the fans. couldn't experience the victory at home. >>
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 157 (some duplicates have been removed)